Dating a pro baseball player

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The self-styled "New York Nine" humbled the Knickerbockers by a score of 23 to 1.Nevertheless, the Knickerbocker Rules were rapidly adopted by teams in the New York area and their version of baseball became known as the "New York Game" (as opposed to the "Massachusetts Game", played by clubs in the Boston area).The Knickerbocker Rules required fielders to tag or force the runner, as is done today, and avoided a lot of the arguments and fistfights that resulted from the earlier practice.Writing the rules didn't help the Knickerbockers in the first known competitive game between two clubs under the new rules, played at Elysian Fields in Hoboken, New Jersey on June 19, 1846.In 1870, a schism formed between professional and amateur ballplayers. The National Association of Professional Base Ball Players operated from 1871 through 1875, and is considered by some to have been the first major league.Its amateur counterpart disappeared after only a few years.The earliest known mention of baseball in the United States was in a 1792 Pittsfield, Massachusetts by law banning the playing of the game within 80 yards of the town meeting house.Another early reference reports that "base ball" was regularly played on Saturdays on the outskirts of New York City (in what is now Greenwich Village) in 1823.

And a still larger number played in the minor leagues and on amateur teams as well.The club members, led by Alexander Cartwright, formulated the "Knickerbocker Rules", which in large part deal with organizational matters but which also lay out rules for playing the game.One of the significant rules was the prohibition of "soaking" or "plugging" the runner; under older rules, a fielder could put a runner out by hitting the runner with the thrown ball.A concerted effort was made to reduce the amount of gambling on games which was leaving the validity of results in doubt.At the same time, a "gentlemen's agreement" was struck between the clubs which endeavored to bar non-white players from professional baseball, a bar which was in existence until 1947.

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