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From looking at the version "A" photo, it appears the one op-amp is used per string to both amplify the signal and create the hex fuzz sound.If you look at IC6, at the top of the version "B" and "C" card, you can see resistors just to the left of the chip creating gain in the negative feedback loop, and additional diodes just to the right side of the chip for generating fuzz. After years of working with Roland vintage electronics, I finally noticed that there were two variations on the familiar hex pickup.He mentioned he had misplaced the paper they sent with the pickup explaining what parts to replace when he installed the new pickup. View the original note from Roland sent to Jonathan Prince. But Mark Wire was able to find a replacement hex divided pickup! 413100 Mark goes on to outline the resistors that need to be changed for the new #610 pickup.I emailed back that his memory was probably fooling him, as there was no official Roland documentation on the pickup change. "We don’t have any humbucking pickups for your G-808 (I physically went out to parts dept. And Mark notes the serial numbers of the new and old pickups: Old type: #601 Pick-Up 22380601 New type: #610 Pick-Up 22380610. As it turns out, these are exactly the modifications that I outline in the notes below.The other vintage controllers, the G-202 and G-505, are well-built, fine guitars.But they cannot escape the feel of being really well made Fender copies, no matter how nice they are. The more expensive G-808 has through-neck construction and other nice features, like gold hardware.

All the G-303s and G-808s that I have checked have op-amp pin outs consistent with the G-505.

Generally, the narrow pickup seems more common in earlier guitars, and the wider pickup is common with the later models.

I had been exchanging emails with GR-user Jonathan Prince, who had, once upon a time, ordered a replacement hex pickup from Roland. Mark Wire, it lays out all the technical information on the pickups that I had only surmised!

In addition, the standard 1/4” output jack solders directly to the PCB, rather than the ribbon connector.

The first time I tried to repair a failed op-amp in a G-303, I realized that the pin-out documentation was wrong on the schematic.

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